Family Classics for the Summer

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Looking for new (to you) entertainment that’s clean and wholesome but quality? Sometimes it’s fun to return to classics from decades gone by. Here are five old but good movies you should watch with your family this summer. This list is in no particular order. [Please use discernment  and discretion with your individual children, circumstances, convictions, and preferences.] Note that there are multiple versions of many of these films, so I have linked to the ones I like.

1. Sergeant York (1941)

The telling of a down-home Tennessee boy who was drafted during World War I, this true account offers a heartwarming blend of history, character, love, and humor. Young Alvin York went from being a pacifist who was more than content hunting turkeys in the woods, to one of the most gifted sharpshooters in the US army. His story is both gripping and inspirational.

2. Flipper (1963)

I grew up watching this summer classic every year with my family in our cool daylight basement. What’s not to love about a blond-haired, barefoot boy and his pet dolphin?

3. A Tale of Two Cities (1980)

When two men of identical appearance cross paths in a chance meeting, neither one can imagine with what radical permanence they will impact one another’s lives. The French Revoluiton is anything but a light subject of entertainment, but this movie is definitely worth a watch. Charles Dickens’ masterful novel is brought to life (albeit not perfectly) in a heart-wrenching but powerful couple of hours. [Due to the traumatic nature of the French Revolution I recommend this film for children ages 13 and up.]

4. Captains Courageous (1937)

Based on Rudyard Kipling’s book, I’m predicting that even the gruffest of viewers may sense a tear or two lurking by the time this classic tale from sea wraps up.

5. Little Lord Fauntleroy [VHS] (1980)

When a young boy from the streets of New York learns he is heir to his wealthy grandfather’s fortune, the rich but stingy old man and generous, exuberant child collide in this delightful classic.

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